Bacon on the Bookshelf

Savory picks for the free range reader

July 27, 2016
by jenniferpuryear

Summer Reading Special: He Said/She Said featuring Louis and Karlen Garrard

Back in the day, the end of July was still the middle of summer.  No more!  But summer’s still going strong at Bacon, with four more Summer Reading specials to finish out the series.  Today’s post features Louis and Karlen Garrard. Louis Garrard is, among other things, a surgeon, a professor at Vanderbilt Medical School, a hunter, and a reader.  For a serious guy, he’s …

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December 18, 2014
by jenniferpuryear

Guest Post by Mary Falls: Grazing for the Literary Omnivore

I don’t think I’ve ever seen Mary Falls at a loss for words, and I’ve known her since we practiced law together very many years ago.  She always seems to have just the right thing to say!  Maybe because she reads so much?  Maybe it was all those siblings competing for air time.  Maybe it’s just her own special gift. In case it’s the reading, here’s what …

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November 28, 2014
by jenniferpuryear

Greatest Hits of 2014

Book Titles: In the Kingdom of Ice, The Untold Story of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free, Strong Inside: The Collision of Race and Sports in the South, Orange is the New Black, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, Us, Euphoria, The Goldfinch, Long Man

I hope Black Friday finds you cozy at home!  I’m impressed with your bravery if you’re headed to the mall, particularly Mean Hills.  The ladies mean business, especially about that parking space.  My advice to you:  concede the space and save yourself. Today’s post features a few ideas as the shopping madness commences.  For more (ideas, not madness), take a look at the books nominated for the …

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October 7, 2014
by jenniferpuryear

Margaret Mead – Among the Tribes – with Malaria – and Between Two Men

Book Title: Euphoria

Lily King makes no grand claim that Euphoria explains Margaret Mead, though her bibliography suggests extensive research.  Reading it made me feel as if I could understand at least partially what it might have felt like to be Margaret Mead – among the tribes – with malaria and big ideas – and between two men. “While this is a work of fiction,” writes King, “it was …

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